Haunting Reads 
Autumn is the perfect time to pull on a sweater and grab a chilling read. Here are a few haunting reads to get you ready for Halloween.


Unspoken by Sarah Rees Brennan


Seventeen-year-old Kami Glass has spent her entire life in a small English town called Sorry-in-the-Vale. She has always had a hard time fitting in; she is Japanese and looks like no one else in her town, and she hears a voice in her head that she has been talking to from the time she was born. But, despite being an outsider, Kami is very bold, constantly pursuing answers to the mysteries that surround her.

She and her best friend and tough sidekick, Angela, run the school newspaper. Life in Sorry-in-the-Vale is fairly dull with few interesting stories to publish outside of children’s cricket camp drama. But everything changes once the Lynburn family returns to town. For starters, the voice in her head, Jared, turns out to be a real person (and not just any person): a Lynburn who seems as gorgeous as he is dangerous. As if that isn’t confusing enough, she also meets his equally attractive cousin, Asher. While Kami is trying to wrap her head around that drama, she is pushed into a well and nearly drowns. Someone is out to kill her, but who, and why? Does the boy in her head hold the answers? Click here for a link to the Library catalog.


The Book of Blood: From Legends and Leeches to Vampires and Veins by HP Newquist


When you think of blood what comes to mind? Gore ? Death? Blood is an essential part of life that has affected human society, both culturally and scientifically. This book explores medical research over several centuries, as well as the folklore, fear, and religious and political barriers that have hindered our understanding of blood and the basic functions of the human body.

Surprisingly, our current knowledge of blood and the circulatory system was not discovered until the beginning of the 19th century. Even after the invention of the microscope, bloodletting continued as standard practice until some doctors began to question it after George Washington’s death.

Beginning with ancient civilizations and mythology, the book follows humanity’s social and scientific relationship with blood through to modern times. The second half of the book details the scientific functions of blood. The last section of the book explores the myths and legends related to blood, such as vampires, that have continued in popular culture. If you want a great read full of information without the dryness of a traditional textbook- I highly recommend the Book of Blood. Click here for a link to the Library catalog.

Have a favorite scary novel or ghost story? Share below in the comments section.

-Melissa McCullough, Children's Librarian, Jeffersontown Branch

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Author Spotlight: Fuyumi Ono 
Calling all fans of anime, manga, fantasy, and horror! If you love complex stories with lots of character development set in amazing new worlds, then the works of Japanese author Fuyumi Ono are for you. Ono has been writing horror and fantasy novels since the late 1980s, and her ability to blend traditional Japanese and Chinese tales with modern ideas makes her books beautifully detailed.


(Image source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Twelve_Kingdoms and http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File: ... ngdoms.png)

Her two most popular series The Twelve Kingdoms (linked to LFPL catalog) and Ghost Hunt have both been adapted into anime series. The Twelve Kingdoms has also been translated into English by former manga publisher Tokyo Pop. The story is about another world that exists on the other side of the ocean from Japan where rulers are chosen by mythical creatures, and evil demons plague the land. High school honor student Yoko is taken into the world of The Twelve Kingdoms to become the king of Kei by one of these mythical creatures. Through her eyes, the audience is introduced to an intricate cast of characters in a richly formed fantasy realm.

Ono’s other popular series, Ghost Hunt, has also been adapted into a manga series. This is a modern day horror series that follows the famous psychic Kazuya Shibuya characterized through ghost-hunting high school student Mai. Through her adventures with Shibuya, Mai develops her own psychic abilities and becomes friends with other spiritualists that join Shibuya’s ghost hunts. There are many scary and sometimes gory moments in this series, so it is not for the faint of heart.

Take some time to branch out from manga authors and check out some of the very talented Japanese novelists like Fuyumi Ono!

-Lynn Johnson, Children and Teen Services, Westport and St. Matthews Branch

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Great Historical Non-Fiction Reads 


Witches: The Absolutely True Tale of Disaster in Salem by Rosalyn Schanzer

In January 1692 in the small village of Salem, Massachusetts, the daughter and niece of the town’s minister, Reverend Parris, had fallen ill with strange symptoms. The young girls would speak in garbled words that no one could recognize, they would twitch and scratch and contort their bodies into abnormal shapes. The reverend and his wife were beside themselves as to how to care for the girls sudden disturbing symptoms, until an elderly town physician examined them and declared that the two were “under an evil hand” also known at the time as being bewitched.

Using startling facts, actual court transcripts, and striking black, white, and red scratch board illustrations, Witches: the absolutely true tale of disaster in Salem tells the story of the period of very dark days of the now infamous town of Salem. In the height of witch hysteria, over 100 individuals were accused of witchcraft and jailed. At least 20 were eventually executed. Brothers accused brothers, children accused parents, rich and poor alike were hauled off to jail to await trials that weren't based on any factual evidence but only on the dreams and visions of the accused.

This was a fascinating historical account that I recommend to anyone who has ever been curious about this dark period in history.



Cleopatra Rules! The Amazing Life of the Original Teen Queen by Vicky Alvear Shecter

Cleopatra. Just her name summons images of other-worldly beauty and ruthless power. Undoubtedly one of the most famous female rulers in history, Cleopatra’s life hasn't always been portrayed in the most flattering of lights given that most of what we know about her came from the Romans, who hated and feared her. However, in Cleopatra Rules! we are offered a fresh and funny look at her life that strives to show Cleopatra’s point of view.

Peppered throughout the book are fascinating facts on Cleopatra and Egyptian life in general. For instance, did you know that Cleo was a hardcore book worm spending many hours of her youth at the Great Library of Alexandria? For a wedding present, Mark Anthony, instead of showering her with the customary jewels, plundered the library in Ephesus, Turkey for her. How romantic!

The author also has a way with words that’s sure to keep you amused, Mark Anthony was a “Roman Redneck,” and Cleo’s competitive siblings were a "a nest of squirming, hissing reality-show stars,” and Cleo herself was “as compelling as a giant magnet in a room full of nails.”

Cleopatra Rules! is a fun but informative trip through the life and times of the original teen queen, check it out from your local LFPL branch!

-Claire, Teen Services, Jeffersontown Library

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A Fresh Start to Superhero Comics 
If you haven’t grown up reading superhero comics the hardest part is figuring out where to start. Trying to choose your first title can be daunting: so many characters, years of storylines, learning what is or isn’t canon, etc... As an aspiring superhero comics reader I was at a loss, until I discovered The New 52 from DC Comics. The New 52 cancelled all of DC’s existing storylines and began a “soft reboot” of popular series, starting over from issue #1. This allows you to start a series from the beginning but also offers a reference point for learning about older comics related to the new titles. Many of The New 52 titles are worth checking out, especially if you have a favorite character, but I’m going to tell you about two of my favorites and additional titles to read when you’re done.



Batgirl Vol. 1: The Darkest Reflection (The New 52).
Barbara Gorden/Batgirl might be a protégé of Batman and the commissioner's daughter, but she can hold her own in Gotham City. She’s a master of karate and a genius to boot. The Darkest Reflection begins shortly after Gorden recovers from three years of paralysis. She is racked with survivor’s guilt and has flashbacks to the night she opened the door to find the Joker, who then shot her and left her to die. Gorden struggles to overcome posttraumatic stress disorder and regain her physical and psychological strength while reentering the crime fighting scene. You’ll learn about other members of the Bat Family and get a glimpse into Batman’s extended universe.

Further Reading


Batman: The Killing Joke by Alan Moore.
The Killing Joke details the events following Barbara Gorden’s shooting. The open-ending will give you the creeps and send you searching for the sequel (spoiler, there isn’t one).

Birds of Prey: Of Like Minds by Gail Simone.
After she is paralyzed by the Joker, Batgirl the crime-fighting librarian becomes Oracle the wheelchair bound computer genius and hacker extraordinaire. Oracle leads the Birds of Prey, a team of crime fighting women involved in global espionage.



Swamp Thing Vol 1: Raise Them Bones (The New 52) by Scott Snyder.
Swamp Thing plays homage to classic b-movie horror films and he is THE environmentalist super hero (move over Captain Planet). In some versions of Swamp Thing, the character is Alec Holland turned monster from the swamp but Snyder’s antihero sticks to the Alan Moore backstory of a plant creature with the memories of the deceased Alec Holland. In this story, he has regained his human form but cannot forget his time as Swamp Thing. This story is pure horror as Holland finds himself in an age old battle between the Green and the Rot.

Further Reading


Anything by Scott Snyder, he seems to be writing every new DC title and with his talent it’s clear why.

Saga of the Swamp Thing by Alan Moore.
This graphic novel should sway anyone who doesn’t believe comics can be high art, while remaining true to its roots in pulp horror. Read this Alan Moore masterpiece, then read everything else he’s written.

What was the first superhero comic you read? Do you have a suggestion for new comic readers? Have you enjoyed any of The New 52? Let us know in the comments.

-Ruth Houston, Teen Services, Teen Underground @ Main

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Discovering Hope: a Summer Book Review 

Shawn Goodman’s Something Like Hope is a beautifully sad story that captivates its readers. Its main character, Shavonne, can only be described as interesting. She is often conflicted by determining the better option: right or wrong. And she usually opts for wrong.

As a confused teen girl who is locked up in a mental institution, she feels as if wrong is the only option. She is close to being released and simply does not want to be. The hospital is all she knows. It is her comfort zone, and she has no desire to step out of it. That is until she meets Mr. Delpopolo. He’s her new therapist and the only one who does not hold her situation against her. He treats her like a person and not a patient.

Can Mr. Delpopolo get her to open up about the secret that is consuming her? Is he able to convince her that she deserves happiness? Freedom? Love?

-Alexis, Children and Teen Services, Okolona Branch

[ 148 comments ] ( 1742 views )

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